Ghost

My Button Collection

Pet Peeve: When people tell me they’re “not political”

campaignsick:

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Google Bus vs. MUNI Bus

whilstinsf:

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What people think they’re like:

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What they’re actually like:
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What people think they’re like:

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What they’re actually like:
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brendapunk13:

Asking hipsters about bands that don’t exist.

Hilarious haha

(Source: youtube.com)

Thanks for another EPIC night in the Frisco Disco, Lady Kier! XOxx

theladymisskier:

and still…. I THRIVE!  

backstage San Fran photos Dec 6, 2013 : Aimee Ellis and Merkley https://www.facebook.com/merkley

styling/hair/makeup….me, myself and I

When I meet someone who was born and raised in San Francisco

sanfranliving:

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theladymisskier:

9 hills i had to climb , alone to find, illusions drop like cherry blossom  petals covering me with the wisdom of time…under crying skys….from the song “illusions” by Lady Miss Kier 2013

# feeling my whole fire at 50

photos : Emme Irwin 2013

<3

thetenssf:

http://valleywag.gawker.com/google-employee-to-protestor-you-cant-afford-it-you-1479755897
Hmmmmmm. 
divisaderocorridor:

Hipster love story. Oak at Divisadero (near Vinyl Cafe).
Photo by KTDrasky.

Hmmmmmm. 

divisaderocorridor:

Hipster love story. Oak at Divisadero (near Vinyl Cafe).

Photo by KTDrasky.

imakeshinythings:

One of my lovely customers sent me a message today with this link.

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And here is my United/World of Love line:

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My heart sank a little bit. The World/United States of Love line that I created is one of the reasons that I was able to quit my full-time job. They even stole the…

tookmyskull:


The Rivals of Irene Adler: La Belle Otero
This is the third in a series on “adventuresses” of the Victorian/Edwardian eras. If you’d like to see the others, follow the “The Rivals of Irene Adler” tag.
If any woman deserves to have a film made of her life, it is Carolina “La Belle” Otero (Nov. 4, 1868 – April 12, 1965). She was born impoverished in Spain; was raped at age 10 (and left sterile); married an Italian count at age 14; and after he died ended up a star at Le Folies Bergere at age 20.
In a few short years, Otero had become the most sought-after courtesan in Europe – so sought after that she could choose her lovers carefully.
They included Prince Albert I of Monaco and King Edward VII of the United Kingdom. You may note King Edward got around – he also had affairs with the first two women in this series.
He also became the center of an elaborate conspiracy theory involving Jack the Ripper, which wasn’t true.
It nevertheless became the subject of a really creepy Sherlock Holmes film, starring Christopher Plummer and James Mason, called “Murder by Decree.”
But back to Carolina. She also had affairs with the Kings of Serbia and Spain; the Russian Grand Dukes Peter and Nicholas; the Duke of Westminster and writer Gabriele D’Annunzio. Her love affairs made her infamous and the envy of many other notable female personalities of the day.
It is rumored that six men killed themselves after their love affairs with her ended and two men fought a duel over her.  She was confident, brilliant and gorgeous.  The twin cupolas of the Hotel Carlton built in 1912 in Cannes are popularly said to have been modeled upon her breasts.
In 1898 in St-Petersburg, the French film operator Félix Mesguich (an employee of the Lumière company) shot a one-minute reel of Otero performing the famous “Valse Brillante,” making her possibly the first movie star in history.
The screening of the film provoked such a scandal that Mesguich was expelled from Russia!
Otero retired after World War I, buying a mansion and property worth the equivalent of $15 million U.S. She had accumulated a massive fortune over the years, about $25 million U.S., but gambled much of it away over the remainder of her lifetime, enjoying a lavish lifestyle, and visiting the casinos of Monte Carlo often.
She lived out her life in a more and more pronounced state of poverty until she died of a heart attack in 1965 in her one-room apartment at the Hotel Novelty in Nice.  A neighbor said of Otero’s last days: “She was constantly talking about her past, and I was not listening any more. It was always the same:  Feasts, princes, champagne.”
Of her heyday and career, Otero once said: “Women have one mission in life: to be beautiful. When one gets old, one must learn how to break mirrors. I am very gently expecting to die.”

tookmyskull:

The Rivals of Irene Adler: La Belle Otero

This is the third in a series on “adventuresses” of the Victorian/Edwardian eras. If you’d like to see the others, follow the “The Rivals of Irene Adler” tag.

If any woman deserves to have a film made of her life, it is Carolina “La Belle” Otero (Nov. 4, 1868 – April 12, 1965). She was born impoverished in Spain; was raped at age 10 (and left sterile); married an Italian count at age 14; and after he died ended up a star at Le Folies Bergere at age 20.

In a few short years, Otero had become the most sought-after courtesan in Europe – so sought after that she could choose her lovers carefully.

They included Prince Albert I of Monaco and King Edward VII of the United Kingdom. You may note King Edward got around – he also had affairs with the first two women in this series.

He also became the center of an elaborate conspiracy theory involving Jack the Ripper, which wasn’t true.

It nevertheless became the subject of a really creepy Sherlock Holmes film, starring Christopher Plummer and James Mason, called “Murder by Decree.”

But back to Carolina. She also had affairs with the Kings of Serbia and Spain; the Russian Grand Dukes Peter and Nicholas; the Duke of Westminster and writer Gabriele D’Annunzio. Her love affairs made her infamous and the envy of many other notable female personalities of the day.

It is rumored that six men killed themselves after their love affairs with her ended and two men fought a duel over her.  She was confident, brilliant and gorgeous.  The twin cupolas of the Hotel Carlton built in 1912 in Cannes are popularly said to have been modeled upon her breasts.

In 1898 in St-Petersburg, the French film operator Félix Mesguich (an employee of the Lumière company) shot a one-minute reel of Otero performing the famous “Valse Brillante,” making her possibly the first movie star in history.

The screening of the film provoked such a scandal that Mesguich was expelled from Russia!

Otero retired after World War I, buying a mansion and property worth the equivalent of $15 million U.S. She had accumulated a massive fortune over the years, about $25 million U.S., but gambled much of it away over the remainder of her lifetime, enjoying a lavish lifestyle, and visiting the casinos of Monte Carlo often.

She lived out her life in a more and more pronounced state of poverty until she died of a heart attack in 1965 in her one-room apartment at the Hotel Novelty in Nice.  A neighbor said of Otero’s last days: “She was constantly talking about her past, and I was not listening any more. It was always the same:  Feasts, princes, champagne.”

Of her heyday and career, Otero once said: “Women have one mission in life: to be beautiful. When one gets old, one must learn how to break mirrors. I am very gently expecting to die.”

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